About Us Blog Contact Us Our Location

Home >>LDL Cholesterol

LDL Cholesterol

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is also called the "bad" cholesterol as too much of it in the blood causes the buildup of plaques in the arteries reducing blood flow causing a condition called atherosclerosis. These plaques can also rupture which leads to heart attack or stroke. The optimal level of LDL in the blood is:

  • An LDL of less than 100 mg/dL is optimal for people at high risk of heart disease or those with heart disease.
  • An LDL of less than 100 mg/dL is the correct level for people at high risk of heart disease or those with heart disease.
  • An LDL of 100 to 129 mg/dL is the correct level.
  • LDL between 130 and 159 mg/dL is considered to be borderline high.
  • An LDL cholesterol between 160 and 189 mg/dL is on the higher side.
  • An LDL of 190 mg/dL or more is known as very high levels.
  • Your individual LDL goal depends on your risk for heart disease:
  • For people on the high risk category for heart disease or those with heart disease are advised to keep the level of LDL less than 100 mg/dL.
  • For people at moderate-to-high risk, an LDL level of less than 130 mg/dL is advised.
  • For people at low-to-moderate risk an LDL level of less than 160 mg/dL is advised.
There are different methods to lower your LDL levels:
  • If you are overweight the best way of lowering LDL is by losing weight.
  • Adding food which contains Omega-3 fats like fish or high-quality fish oil supplement will help in lowering LDL levels.
  • Include healthy fats like those from olive, nuts and avocados in your diet but avoid unhealthy fats like Trans fats.
  • Lower your bad cholesterol by eating plenty of fruits and vegetables.
  • Reduction in alcohol intake will lower LDL levels.
  • Regular exercise helps burn calories and lower LDL levels.
  • Medication is recommended when changes in diet and lifestyle don't bring your triglyceride levels back to a healthy range.

CONTACT US APPOINTMENT